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Ransomware in the Cloud

In the past year, we have seen a plague of ransomware attacks, with big and small targets including Britain’s National Health Service, San Francisco’s light-rail network, and big companies such as FedEx. Ransomware is a relatively simple form of malware that breaches defenses and locks down computer files using strong encryption. Hackers then demand money in exchange for a digital key to unlock their data. Victims will often pay, especially if the material encrypted hasn’t been backed up.

Spam, Phishing, and Social Engineering

Human error is the leading cause of data breaches. Unpatched software and social engineering are the causes for most attacks.  We should expect to see even more attacks like these as time goes on. Fortunately, the problem of human fallibility may have a budding solution in the form of Artificial Intelligence (AI). In the meantime, MVP provides a human Security Training that can train your staff on what threats to look for and what scams to not fall for. Find more information at www.mvpworks.com/PIIProtect  

Artificial Intelligence-powered attacks?

AI can be used to automate the collection of certain information, perhaps relating to a specific organization which may be sourced from support forums, social media platforms and more. Additionally, AI may be able to assist hackers when it comes to cracking passwords by narrowing down the number of probable passwords based on geography, demographics and other such factors. This calls for MORE cybersecurity solutions than ever.  


 

brain.pngSam Altman, an American entrepreneur, investor, programmer and blogger has just spent a whopping $10,000 with a start-up company to one day, preserve his brain. According to MIT Technology review, Sam is but 1 of 25 other people who have put down a $10,000 refundable deposit to join a waiting list at Nectome, a company whose sole purpose is to archive your mind.

The Catch…

While being on a waiting list to have your brain archived may seem cool and something to do out of the ordinary, there’s just one tiny catch. Nectome’s Co-founder Robert McIntyre, told MIT Technology Review, that the process is “100 percent fatal”. That’s right, the tiny catch is you must die.

The Procedure

The company needs to embalm a living brain for it to potentially be stimulated later by a computer. The living person or customer, would be hooked up to a machine, and then pumped full of Nectome’s custom embalming fluids and chemicals. Oh yeah, this is where the death part happens. According to Co-founder Robert McIntyre, the user experience is compared to a “physician-assisted suicide”.

 

 


 

What is the “Surface Web”?

It is best to imagine the Web as an entire ocean: the surface web is the top of the ocean which appears to spread for miles around and is the easiest part of the ocean to see or "access". You can access the surface web using any of the main search engines (Google, Bing, Yahoo etc.). You are on the surface web for example when you are buying from Amazon or reading the daily news.

What is the “Deep Web”?

The Deep Web was also part of the web at its conception, and in simple terms, it is the opposite of the surface as it is anything that search engines cannot find. This is the key difference between the two in real data terms; sites on the surface internet are indexed for search engines to find, but the deep web is not indexed. Both are available to the public, but special software is needed to access the deep web.

What is the “Dark Web”?

 The Dark Web IS part of the Deep Web, but it has one major difference in that it has been intentionally hidden and is inaccessible to normal web browsers. The technology to create the Dark Web was initially created (and still funded) by US Military Researchers in the mid-1990s to allow spies and intelligence agencies to anonymously send and receive messages. Named "The Onion Router", it was quickly coined with the shorter "Tor" with its name coming from application layer encryption within a communication protocol stack; many layers representing the layers of an onion.

 


 

Elon_Musk.jpgScammers are posing as celebrities, like Elon Musk, and using their status as a way to get innocent people to give them crypto-currency. These scammers are using similar usernames to the genuine accounts, making them seem more credible.

How Does The Scam Work?

While scammers are impersonating Elon Musk (whose fans were a real target) they then post replies to popular tweets made by the real Elon Musk. This gives their deceiving messages prominence when targeting the celebrity’s fans.  The scammers then ask people to send them small amounts of crypto-currency, offering to send a larger amount back as part of a giveaway.

How To Avoid Being Scammed

The golden rule here is “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Celebrities are most likely not going to ask you for money to give you back more in return. This concept doesn’t make much sense to begin with, as they have a large amount of money at the start. Celebrities like Elon Musk also have a blue checkmark next to their name to symbolize a genuine account. Never give your password, or any other information to anyone you don’t personally know very well over the internet.


 

 

EEG-Headset.jpgEEG is an electrophysiological monitoring method to record the electrical activity of the brain. These headsets allow people to make a ball float in front of them, simply by using their brainwaves. EEG, however, is most often used to diagnose epilepsy, by being able to sense abnormalities in the brain.

Hackers and Brainwaves?

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham suggest that brainwave-sensing headsets, known as EEG (electroencephalograph) headsets, need better protection and security. A recent study revealed hackers could guess a user’s password by monitoring their brainwaves. How jaw-dropping is this? Now we need to worry about hackers hacking our brains?

What Does This Mean?

In a real-world attack, if more and more people begin utilizing these headsets for gameplay, Virtual Reality, and/or school or work a hacker could facilitate the step required for the malicious program to be initiated through the headset. This program begins by requesting that the user enter a predefined set of numbers to restart the game/program being played or used, after pausing it to take a break, like the way CAPTCHA is used to verify users when logging onto websites. Hackers are becoming more creative as well as dangerous. Understanding how to protect yourself has never been more relevant.


 

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